EPI phase correction algorithms

At high resolution EPI, the gradients are pushed to their limits and the ramp sampling ratio is particularly large. This means that the ghosting is increased and the Nyquist ghost correction is getting more important. In this post, I describe how to change the Nyquist ghost correction algorithm.

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The high ramp sampling ratio in high-resolution EPI results in larger ghosts. Changing the correction algorithm from “normal” to “local” can help a lot.

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SS-SI VASO pitfalls in visual cortex

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Activation maps for BOLD and VASO. At about 0.8 mm resolution, one starts to see that VASO is less sensitive to large draining veins.

With respect to high-resolution VASO application, visual cortex is very unique. Because of its high demand, the most important pitfalls of SS-SI VASO in visual cortex are discussed below.

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Unwanted spatial blurring during resampling

In layer-fMRI, we spend so much time and effort to achieve high spatial resolutions and small voxel sizes during the acquisition. However, during the evaluation pipeline much of this spatial resolution can be lost during multiple resampling steps.

In this post, I want to discuss sources of signal blurring during spatial resampling steps and potential strategies to account for them.

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Partial-Fourier imaging at High Resolutions

This blog post discusses the resolution loss when applying partial-Fourier imaging in GE-EPI in the presence of strong T2*-decay.

I found that that when I was aiming for high-resolutions, it is beneficial to refrain from the application of partial Fourier (PF) imaging as much as possible. For the long readout durations at high-resolutions and the fast T2/T2*-decay at high field strengths results in even stronger blurring of partial-Fourier.

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Finding ROI of the double layers in M1

In this post I want to describe the guidelines that helped me to find the right spot of primary motor cortex (M1) that has a double-layer pattern during a conventional finger tapping task.

The motor cortex is an excellent model system to debug-layer fMRI methodology for multiple reasons:

  1. It has a consistent folding pattern across people.
  2. Its folding pattern is convoluted across one axis only. Hence, it is possible to use thicker slices with higher in-plane resolution.
  3. With 4mm, its is the thickest part of the cortex compared to all other areas. Hence, layer analysis can be done even with 1.2 mm voxels.
  4. It has an expected double layer structure, with two separate peaks. The separability of the peaks can be used as a measure of functional specificity.
  5. It is very close to the RF-receive coils and has high tSNR.
  6. It is easy to shim.

One tricky part, however, is to find the right location of the double layer feature.

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Quick analysis pipeline of getting layer fMRI profiles without anatomical reference data

This is a step-by-step description on how to obtain layer profiles from any high-resolution fMRI dataset. It is based on manual delineated ROIs and does not require the tricky analysis steps including distortion correction, registration to whole brain “anatomical” datasets, or automatic tissue type segmentation. Hence this is a very quick way for a first glance of the freshly acquired data.

This post shows how you can get from activation maps to layer-profiles in 10 min. In a quick and dirty way.

The important steps are: 1.) Upscaling, 2.) Manual delineation of GM, 3.) Calculation of cortical depths in ROI, 4.) Extracting functional data based on calculated cortical depths.

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